Rebekah Presson Mosby

From Amazon.com:
A very smartly assembled two-disc compilation of African American poetry, Our Souls Have Grown Deep Like the Rivers digs deep to unearth a wealth of unheard and rare material spanning almost the entire 20th century. The collection features some of the greatest names in black literature, and--as Al Young points out in the liner notes--it can be a revelation to hear, for instance, Harlem Renaissance leader Langston Hughes pronounce the word "Harlem" with utter pride and joy. Other notables include Ishmael Reed, Nikki Giovanni, Gwendolyn Brooks, Gil Scott-Heron, Maya Angelou, Rita Dove, W.E.B. DuBois, the Last Poets, Public Enemy, Wanda Coleman... You get the picture--it's sort of a greatest-hits of black spoken word. But it's too scattershot a set to be called definitive--anyone can bemoan the absence of this or that poet--but it is also a tremendously interesting document of hope and loss and rage and joy and perseverance--and, above all, remarkable poetry, works that each gain from the original authors' reading of their poem. Amiri Baraka's sonorous recitation of "Bang, Bang Outishly," a beat-era work dedicated to Thelonious Monk, is worth the price of admission by itself. --Mike McGonigal

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Our Souls Have Grown Deep Like the Rivers: Black Poets Read Their Work

Selected Works

Award-winning revision of the bestselling "Poetry Speaks"
Revised version of "Poetry Speaks" with five new poets, including James Joyce and May Swenson.
Four CD box set
Archival recordings of 98 poets reading their work. The most comprehensive anthology of poets reading their work ever.
Poetry
"This is the definitive anthology to date of canonical poets reading short selections of their own work...”
--Publishers Weekly
“digs deep to unearth a wealth of unheard and rare material spanning almost the entire 20th century. The collection features some of the greatest names in black literature, and--as Al Young points out in the liner notes--it can be a revelation to hear..."
--from Amazon.com
”Throughout this set, poetry’s bad rep for being stodgy and academic vanishes into something joyfully, wittily alive.”
--Newsweek